The Cultural Monuments 
of Tibet's Outer Provinces

AMDO
Volume 2. The Gansu and Sichuan Parts of Amdo


by

Andreas Gruschke
The first volume was just published in June 2001, the second volume in October 2001. In Europe prices are 55,- Euro each volume plus shipping costs. [1,- Euro corrseponds to approx. 1 US $]



The Cultural Monuments of Tibet's Outer Provinces. 
Volume 2. 
The Gansu and Sichuan Parts of Amdo reveals that Tibetans have rebuilt their economy and revitalized their traditional way of life. Despite Tibet being an issue, east Tibet has not until now been thoroughly researched, though it comprises about two thirds of the Tibetan Plateau. It is astounding, therefore, that the West knows hardly anything about it. This book, together with vol.1, makes up this deficit, providing interested readers with comprehensive information about unknown sites in Amdo, which are fascinating and puzzling, as well as their role in history.
   This second volume on Amdo first presents unknown Tibetan Buddhist art and hitherto overlooked Sino-Tibetan lamaseries on the silk Road fringes. Labrang Monastery in the Tibeto-Chinese borderlands highlights the nexus between Tibet, East and Central Asia. Continuing south in Gansu, the Sichuan part of Amdo contains a wealth of local Tibetan cultural centres. The importance ofthe Ngawa Gelugpa realm and the last Jonangpa communities in Dzamthang have been absolutely underestimated for centuries. This book helps to dispel some of the uninformed views which have been spread in the West.
   Detailed descriptions of the major historic sites facilitate understanding of their development, and provides guidance to find the sights and understand what can be seen there. One can prepare a tour to this region in advance by going through this presentation of the extraordinary cultural monuments presented in this volume.
   Serta, the world's largest Buddhist academy, virtually unknown, has impressive architectural features such as the Jonang chörten and temple towers seen nowhere else in Tibet. These add to the hidden treasures of Amdo's living and revitalized Buddhist tradition. The region presented in this book is one of diversity in a highland realm that for long was neglected in respect of its historic and cultural importance.




Contents of:

The Cultural Monuments of Tibet's Outer Provinces
Amdo
Volume 2. The Gansu and Sichuan Parts of Amdo

Foreword ....................................................................................................................i
Introductory Notes .....................................................................................................iv
Introduction to Tibet’s Cultural Provinces Amdo and Kham..................................1
Part 1. Northeast and Eastern Tibet: settlement pattern and current political divisions .....1
Part 2. Amdo ..............................................................................................................6
P 2.1. Derivation of the toponym ‘Amdo’ ....................................................................7
P 2.2. A historical sketch of Tibet’s Amdo region .......................................................10
P 2.3. Highlights of Amdo culture ...............................................................................16

The Gansu part of Amdo

1. Lamaist Temples on the Silk Road Margin .......................................................20
1.1. Monasteries in Thendru: northernmost Tibetan settlements ....................................20
1.1.1. Chörten Thang .................................................................................................20
1.1.2. Yarlung Thurchen Monastery ...........................................................................21
1.1.3. Tawen Gompa .................................................................................................21
1.1.4. Taglung Monastery ..........................................................................................21
1.1.5. Tethung Dorje Changgi Lhakhang ....................................................................22
1.1.6. Tethung Gönchen ............................................................................................22
1.1.6. Namtethung Drag Gön .....................................................................................22
1.2. Mati Monastery and the Horseshoe Grottoes ......................................................22
1.3. Ming dynasty Tibetan Art in Bingling Si ...............................................................24
2. Labrang Tashi Chil - Gelugpa Order's spiritual centre ....................................28
3. Monasteries of Heitso, Chone and the marshes of the Ma Chu .....................44
3.1. Heitso Monastery ...............................................................................................44
3.2. Chone Lamasery ................................................................................................48
3.3. Tagtshang Lhamo ...............................................................................................50
3.4. Other Lamaseries of Kanlho ...............................................................................53
3.4.1. Shitshang Gompa ............................................................................................54
3.4.2. The White Crag Monastery .............................................................................54
3.4.3. Terlung Monastery ..........................................................................................55
3.4.4. Ganden Tashi Samdrub Ling ...........................................................................55
3.4.5. Yerwa Gompa ................................................................................................55
3.4.6. Pelshe Dengkha Gompa ..................................................................................55
3.4.7. Wangtshang Monastery ...................................................................................56
3.4.8. Marnyung Jampa Ling .....................................................................................56

The Sichuan part of Amdo

4. The Dzöge area in the marshes of the Ma Chu ................................................58
4.1. Deshing Gompa ..................................................................................................58
4.2. Tagtsha Gompa ..................................................................................................59
4.3. Juxiang Si and other Bön centres of Dzöge ..........................................................59
4.4. Chögyal* Monastery ..........................................................................................59
5. The Flourishing Monastic Life in Ngawa ..........................................................61
5.1. The Bönpo order and its monasteries in Ngawa ..................................................62
5.1.1. The Bön religion ..............................................................................................62
5.1.2. Nangshig Gompa ............................................................................................64
5. 2. Monasteries of Buddhist sects in Ngawa valley ..................................................65
5.2.1. Kirti Gompa ...................................................................................................66
5.2.2. Gomang Monastery ........................................................................................68
5.2.3. Amchog Tshennyi Gompa ...............................................................................68
6. Long-hidden and unexplored Dzamthang ...............................................................71
6.1. Buddhist Monasteries of Dzamthang ............................................................71
6.1.1. Sirin Kar ........................................................................................................71
6.1.2. Bangtuo Monastery ........................................................................................75
6. 2. Monasteries of the forgotten Jonangpa ..............................................................75
6.2.1. The Jonangpa Order ......................................................................................76
6.2.2. Dzamthang Tsangwa Monastery .....................................................................78
6.2.3. Ngayül Se Monastery .....................................................................................82
7. Serta and the world’s largest Buddhist Academy ............................................85
7.1. The Buddhist Academy of Serthang Larung Ngarig Nangten Lobling ...................85  [news]
7.2. Dündül Chörten .................................................................................................90

Amdo and Tibet: common cultural features and differences .............93

1. Tibet and its Periphery ..........................................................................................95
2. Amdo: aspects of popular religion - prayer-flags, lhatos and chörten ......................96

Concluding Remarks on the delimitation of Amdo .............................101

Notes .....................................................................................................................103
Bibliography ...........................................................................................................1...
Glossary .................................................................................................................1...
Index - mini gazetteer ..............................................................................................1...

See also the complete index of the two volumes on Amdo
àclick here


ISBN 974-7534-90-8

Order now  -  bestellen Sie hier!




«The Cultural Monuments of Tibet’s Outer Provinces: 
Amdo» (Northeastern Tibet)

in zwei Bänden im White Lotus Verlag

published in two volumes at White Lotus Publishers, Bangkok 2001:

vol. 1: Volume 1. The Qinghai Part of Amdo
published in June 2001
ISBN 974-7534-59-2

Price in Germany:  55,- Euro
Order in Germany / aktueller Preis in Deutschland


vol. 2: The Gansu and Sichuan Parts of Amdo
published in October 2001
ISBN 974-7534-90-8

Price in Germany:  55,- Euro
Order in Germany / aktueller Preis in Deutschland

«The Cultural Monuments of Tibet’s Outer Provinces: 
Kham (Eastern Tibet)»

to be published in three volumes at White Lotus Press, ca. 2003/2004

Booksellers

Possible merchant in UK: acornbks zShop (85,- £ for a set of both vols.)
Possible merchant in Switzerland: Asiatica Books (sFr 96,- each vol.)
Possible merchant in Australia: The Asian experts

Merchant in Asia: White Lotus Press
11/2 Soi 58, Sukhumvit Road, Bangkok 10250, Thailand 
Tel. (662) 332-4915, (662) 741-6288/9 
Fax (662) 311-4575, (662) 741-6287 
E-mail: ande@thailine.com or ande@loxinfo.co.th


 
 


See details (contents) of

Order now  -  bestellen Sie hier!









Rezensionen - reviews 

R 2-1 Review by Dr. Martin Lehnert, Orientalisches Seminar, Universität Zürich (Switzerland)
Andreas Gruschke:  The Cultural Monuments of Tibet’s Outer Provinces: Amdo, Vol. 2. The Gansu and Sichuan Parts of Amdo. Bangkok: White Lotus Press 2001. ISBN 974-7534-90-8; xx, 263 Seiten.
The Cultural Monuments of Tibet’s Outer Provinces: Amdo, Vol. 2. The Gansu and Sichuan Parts of Amdo ergänzt den Anfang letzten Jahres erschienenen ersten Band The Qinghai Part of Amdo vom selben Autor, eine umfangreiche Arbeit, die als mar-kantes Etappenziel einer nachhaltigen Forschungstätigkeit zur Geschichte und Kultur Tibets charakterisiert werden könnte. Band 2 präsentiert das umfangreiche Material in Wort und Bild – wie schon Band 1 – systematisch: Neben einem umfangrei-chen Stichwortverzeichnis (inkl. Band 1) und Glossar, ermöglichen separate Verzeichnisse der Karten, Tafeln, Risszeichnungen und der hervorragend reproduzierten Farbfotographien seine Nutzung als Nachschlagewerk. Ein Apparat mit wertvollen Anmer-kungen ergänzt den inhaltlich dichten Textteil.
Amdo ist eine von der (westlichen) Forschung bislang wenig beachtete Region Tibets an der Nahtstelle zu den chinesischen und zentralasiatischen Kulturräumen. Andreas Gruschke kennt die von ihm beschriebenen Regionen und Orte nicht nur aus eigener Anschauung, sondern versteht es auch, seine Beobachtungen kritisch in den Kontext der von ihm ausgewerteten aktu-ellen Forschungsliteratur einzubinden. Insbesondere seine kritische Rezeption der jüngsten chinesischsprachigen Fachliteratur erweist sich für den geopolitischen und kulturhistorischen Rahmen dieser Studie als ertragreich.
Gruschkes detaillierte Darstellung einer in zahlreichen Baudenkmälern und Kunstgegenständen dokumentierten Vergangenheit verstellt keinesfalls den Blick für eine politisch, wirtschaftlich und kulturell lebendige Gegenwart. Er demonstriert z.B. an Hand der historischen Hintergründe einzelner Klöster den seit vielen Jahrhunderten währenden materiellen und geistigen Transfer zwischen China und Tibet ebenso pointiert, wie die Verflochtenheit von Bön-Religion und Buddhismus oder die politische und wirtschaftliche Konkurrenz unter den Schulen des Buddhismus.
Die ausführlichen Beschreibungen zentraler Klosteranlagen geben nicht nur Aufschluss über Historizität und Erhaltungszustand der einzelnen Baulichkeiten und ihres Inventars, sondern thematisieren auch ihre aktuelle Nutzung z.B. als Klosterschulen, wodurch dem Leser ein am Konkreten orientiertes, aktuelles Bild der hier besprochenen Region Tibets vermittelt wird.
Von religionshistorischem Interesse ist Gruschkes Darstellung der in Zentraltibet im 17. Jhdt. ausgelöschten und in der Folge beinahe in Vergessenheit geratenen Jonangpa-Schule (S.70-80), deren Überlieferung in dem nicht leicht zugänglichen Kreis Dzamthang jedoch bis in die Gegenwart intakt geblieben zu sein scheint. Deren eigene Konzeption des abrupten Erwachens (Skt.: yaugapadya), welche Einflüsse der chinesischen Chan-Tradition andeutet, wurde als Häresie verurteilt, und die Schule nach dem Tod ihres berühmten Lehrers Taranatha (1575-1634) unter dem fünften Dalai Lama der Verfolgung anheimgegeben. Die Gründe für ihre Verfolgung sind jedoch – entgegen der Darstellung der traditionellen Geschichtsschreibung – weniger reli-giös-dogmatischer denn religionspolitischer und wirtschaftlicher Natur, wie Gruschke im Einzelnen zeigt. Bemerkenswert sind auch seine Angaben zur gegenwärtigen Situation dieser Schule, welche inzwischen wieder 4000 bis 5000 Mönche zählt und an der Tibetan Buddhist Academy in Beijing durch eigenes Lehrpersonal vertreten ist.
Die Darstellung strittiger Lehrinhalte der einzelnen, miteinander konkurrierenden buddhistischen Schulen ist trotz der notwendi-gen Beschränkung auf grundlegende Konzepte und Begriffe präzise genug, um die jeweilige Problematik auch dem Laien ver-ständlich zu machen, wenngleich damit die vertiefende Lektüre entsprechender buddhologischer Fachliteratur keinesfalls über-flüssig wird, da manche Hintergründe und dogmatische Verschlaufungen wegen des hierfür erforderlichen Raumes ausge-klammert wurden. Dies kann aber auch als ein Vorzug dieser Arbeit gewertet werden, insofern die sonst bei vielen Tibet-Publikationen anzutreffende Fokussierung auf die buddhistische Religion hier auf ein ausgewogenes Verhältnis gegenüber anderen, nicht minder wichtigen Aspekten abgestimmt wurde.
Bei aller gebotenen Knappheit der Darstellung gewährleistet die genaue Kenntnis und Vertrautheit Gruschkes mit seinem For-schungsgegenstand einen ausgewogenen und sachlichen Zugang. Dieser äussert sich nicht zuletzt auch in den 190 technisch hervorragenden Farbfotographien im Bildteil dieser Arbeit; allein sie vermitteln schon dem Betrachter einen ebenso informativen wie sensiblen Einblick in die nordöstliche Region von Amdo; sie zeigen Menschen, Gebäude, Klosteranlagen und Ortschaften im Kontext einer abwechslungsreichen Landschaft als Ausdruck tibetischer Gegenwart. Als Beispiel möchte ich nur auf eine Abbildung des Dündül Chörten (S.180) verweisen: Sie zeigt den Stupa perspektivisch kleiner als eine im Bildvordergrund be-findliche windschiefe Warntafel am Strassenrand, welche die Autofahrer auf Pilger/Fussgänger hinweisen soll.
Abschliessend möchte ich hervorheben, dass sich Gruschke grundsätzlich in wohltuender Weise jedweder Apologetik gängiger Klischees von Tibet als dem Reich “genuiner Buddha-Spiritualität” enthält und deshalb auch nicht Gefahr läuft, der im dialekti-schen Umschlag konstituierten Sicht Tibets als eine an der chinesischen Politik und “Verwestlichung” zerbrochenen kulturellen Identität anheim zu fallen.
Das noch nicht abgeschlossene, auf mehrere Bände angelegte Werk, welches sich sowohl an Fachleute wie an jeden allgemein an Tibet Interessierten richtet, dürfte seinem hohen Anspruch “to produce a synoptical work that provides a general intro-duction to Amdo and Kham, besides a deeper insight into the culture of its people, and a foundation for future research and study of the historical monuments and cultures of east Tibetans” (S. 98) wohl mehr als gerecht werden.
Martin Lehnert 
R 2-2 Rezension von Dr. Michael Buddeberg, München

Was ist Tibet? Ist es ein Teil Chinas mit einer einem Irrglauben anhängenden Minderheit? Ein sprirituelles Shangri-La mit friedvollen, tiefreligiösen Menschen? Ist es gar nur ein geographischer Begriff für das durch hohe und unwegsame Randgebirge begrenzte, höchste Plateau der Erde? Oder ist Tibet, wo Tibeter leben und wo tibetisch gesprochen wird, wo Menschen eine ganz besondere Art des Buddhismus praktizieren, den Mahayana, das „Große Fahrzeug“? Ist es vielleicht nur ein politischer Begriff, TAR, „Tibetan Autonomous Region“, der eine Provinz von anderen chinesischen Provinzen abgrenzt? Alles ist richtig und doch auch wider nicht. Je mehr man sich mit Tibet befaßt oder gar Tibet bereist, um so schwieriger wird die Antwort auf die eingangs gestellte Frage. Ein Blick auf die Geschichte und die aktuelle Politik macht die Antwort nicht leichter. Was Tibet ist, war ... ...

... ... ... weiterlesen (hier anklicken) ..
Die Eigenständigkeit und Besonderheit buddhistischer Kultur in Amdo zeigt sich schließlich auch im Umgang mit Gebetsfahnen. Vor allem im weiten Grasland der Ngoloks, des einstmals so berüchtigten räuberischen Stammes, werden aus Gebetsfahnen ganze Gebäude errichtet. Kommt man von weitem, glaubt man sich einem hohen Turm, einem Chörten oder einer Pyramide zu nähern, die sich dann beim Näherkommen als luftige, grazile Skulpturen aus bedruckten Textilien erweisen. Was im Westen als kreatives Werk der "land art" bewundert werden würde, markiert in Amdo in der Regel einen besonders heiligen Platz, den Ort der Himmelsbestattung. Die beiden glänzend geschriebenen und reichhaltig illustrierten Bände über die kulturellen Denkmäler von Amdo rücken eine bisher unterschätzte und weitgehend unbekannte Region Tibets ins rechte Licht. (- mb -)

Michael Buddeberg
http://www.preetoriusstiftung.de/
[Homepage der Preetorius-Stiftung]........


 

ñññ

Order now  -  bestellen Sie hier!


Contact and information:
White Lotus Press
11/2 Soi 58, Sukhumvit Road, Bangkok 10250, Thailand
Tel. (662) 332-4915, (662) 741-6288-9 / Fax (662) 311-4575, (662)741-6287
E-mail:
ande@thailine.com
ande@loxinfo.co.th
Gästebuch

 

 
 
 
Suchen nach:
 
In Partnerschaft mit Amazon.de

 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

ñññ

 
 


 

East Tibet

The Dokham Homepage
 

Tibetan Cultural Region Directory
 


Kontakt:
E-mail















 


counted - since April 2001